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Jul 02

2019

New Hosted Game! Scratch by Cloud Buchholz

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (0)

Hosted Games has a new game for you to play!

A millionaire’s secluded estate. A collection of dead girls. A group of reluctant strangers. One is the killer …but who? You need more than your badge and gun to catch the killer. Only a sharp mind and the right questions will uncover this mystery. It’s 33% off until Jul 9th!

Scratch is a 165,000 word interactive murder mystery by Cloud Buchholz, where your choices control the story. It’s entirely text-based—without graphics or sound effects—and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

You’re a small town detective. An anonymous tip leads you to a collection of sadistically murdered girls dumped on the forest estate of an eccentric, reclusive millionaire. A group of strangers are holed up in his dilapidated cabin, waiting out the recent storm.

They seem unaware of the murders, but the serial killer is hidden among them. You need to interrogate the suspects, gather clues, and stop the killer, but if you don’t tread carefully, more innocent people will die.

• Play as male or female
• Interrogate seven potential suspects and discover their sordid pasts
• Gather clues from your conversations to root out the killer
• Succumb to your alcohol addiction or fight withdrawals
• Recall cases from your past and the cruel life lessons from your Pa
• Seventeen unique endings

Cloud Buchholz developed this game using ChoiceScript, a simple programming language for writing multiple-choice interactive novels like these. Writing games with ChoiceScript is easy and fun, even for authors with no programming experience. Write your own game and Hosted Games will publish it for you, giving you a share of the revenue your game produces.

Jul 02

2019

New Hosted Game! A Sensei’s Story by Dom Fella

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (1)

Hosted Games has a new game for you to play!

Unhappy with your life? Then see if the grass is truly greener on the other side…of the world! Will you work hard and be the best English teacher you can be? Or, will you mess about and become the bane of the Teach English to Speakers of Other Languages world? It’s 33% off until July 9th!

A Sensei’s Story is a 240,000 word interactive novel by Dom Fella, where your choices control the story. It’s entirely text-based—without graphics or sound effects—and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

Find out if you have what it takes to teach English in a foreign land, as you live, laugh, and love each day in Japan!

• Play as male or female; straight, gay, bisexual, or asexual
• Experience what it’s like to live and work in the Japanese city of Fukuoka
• Make friends, enemies, or lovers out of your fellow co-workers
• Become your eccentric boss’s new pet or drive him up the wall with your antics
• Visit a scenic island where you can go fishing, swimming, and tomb raiding
• Teach with kindness and intelligence or sarcasm and stupidity

Dom Fella developed this game using ChoiceScript, a simple programming language for writing multiple-choice interactive novels like these. Writing games with ChoiceScript is easy and fun, even for authors with no programming experience. Write your own game and Hosted Games will publish it for you, giving you a share of the revenue your game produces.

Jul 02

2019

New Hosted Game! Who Was The Real Robin Hood? by Christy Waites

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (0)

Hosted Games has a new game for you to play!

From royal birth, to outlaw, Robyn lives the carefree life in Sherwood Forest, robbing from the undeserving rich and giving to the wretched poor. But when Prince John makes him an Enemy of the Crown and places a high bounty on his head, Robyn decides it would be best if he, and anyone who wanted to, make a quick dismissal from Sherwood. It’s 33% off until July 9th!

Who Was The Real Robin Hood? is a 150,000 word interactive novel by Christy Waites, where your choices control the story. It’s entirely text-based—without graphics or sound effects—and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

On a pirate ship that belonged to his good friend, the Moor, he left the shores of an English port with Marian, her hand servant, and his Merry Men. Soon an unusual fog envelops the ship and when it lifts, the ship had taken itself to the shores of an unknown land. The Isle of Varna.

At least, that is one tale.

Maybe the Elves of Light show up in Sherwood Forest requesting the help of Robyn and Marian to retrieve their powerful weapon and rescue their daughter, and magically spirit them away? Maybe Marian went to the Hag of 49th Alley for help? There wasn’t much time before bounty hunters would be combing the forest looking for Robyn’s camp and the Hag does have her special ways of making things happen quickly.

What happens simply depends on who you are playing, Marian or Robyn, and which choices you make.

• Play as Robyn, or Marian
• Be highly efficient with a bow and arrow, sword, knife, or staff
• Be brave when you face Zerkit
• Charm Edent, the Dragon
• Find Kizzy, the Dragon, and two missing eggs
• Refrain from giving an autograph to the Fair Folk who know your tales
• Plan a quick, surprise, outdoor wedding for Marian

Christy Waites developed this game using ChoiceScript, a simple programming language for writing multiple-choice interactive novels like these. Writing games with ChoiceScript is easy and fun, even for authors with no programming experience. Write your own game and Hosted Games will publish it for you, giving you a share of the revenue your game produces.

Jun 27

2019

This week: A Sitewide SALE! All games up to 40% off! And, new edits to the Heroes Rise series!

Posted by: Mary Duffy | Comments (0)

Coinciding with Steam’s annual Summer Sale, we’re putting every Choice of Games title on sale in our webstore. You heard that right. All our games, on sale, up to 40% off their sticker price.

If you’re accustomed to buying your games on Google Play or in the iOS Omnibus App, you can still get these games on sale!

All you need to do is:

1. Purchase a game on sale through our website.

2. Restore your purchase! To do that:
a) Download the game’s app from Google Play.
or
b) Navigate to the game in the iOS Omnibus App.

then select “Restore Purchases,” and restore your purchase by logging in with your choiceofgames.com account (the one you just used or created to buy the game from our site.)

***
We’d also like to take moment to announce there are new edits to Zachary Sergi’s Heroes Rise games, with new options to play as non-binary or transgender! Heroes Rise is our most popular series of games, and as we mentioned, they’re all on sale right now! Check out Heroes Rise, The Hero Project, HeroFall, Redemption Season, and Open Season now!

Jun 27

2019

Pre-order Exile of the Gods, sequel to Champion of the Gods today!

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (0)

We’re offering our fans a chance to pre-order our next game, Exile of the Gods by Jonathan Valuckas, the upcoming sequel to Champion of the Gods.

We’ll release the game to the public on Thursday, July 11th; you can buy it today at a discounted price. If you buy it here on our website, you’ll be able to play it on your preferred device when the game comes out.

Wield the chains of destiny, or shatter them?

In the great war between the gods, will you wield the chains of destiny, or shatter them forever?

Exile of the Gods is a 460,000 word interactive epic fantasy novel by Jonathan Valuckas, where your choices control the story. It’s entirely text-based—without graphics or sound effects—and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

Our story begins twenty years after the action of the first game, 2015’s Champion of the Gods. Which ending did you get? Start this game as the Champion, a warrior born to serve the gods, and follow the holy destiny the Weavers have crafted for you. Or start this game as the Exile, enemy of the gods, and forge a new life for yourself in the faraway land of Khovros–where mortals are free to choose their own fates.

Champion and Exile alike must unravel a deadly conspiracy, and confront the brewing war upon their gods. Will you vanquish this invading force, or use its power to free your realm from its ruthless creators forever? Take revenge on the gods who exiled you, or steal this chance to prove your worth to the pantheon, and seize your destiny of glory?

The gods made you what you are. Now, you will show them what you are made of.

  • Play as male, female, or nonbinary; gay, straight, bi, or ace
  • Take the role of your realm’s beloved savior, or that of a vengeful warrior living in exile
  • Explore a world inspired by the myths of Ancient Greece
  • Fight land and sea battles inspired by the military campaigns of antiquity
  • Unravel a divine conspiracy that spans two realms, complete with shocking twists
  • Use the power of Inspiration to endow your companions with unearthly prowess, or wield Rapture to stun your enemies with bliss
  • Move the hearts of your foes with your sincerity, or harness the power of deception to spin a lie that suits your fancy
  • Play the game in standalone mode, or import your skills and backstory from “Champion of the Gods” to unlock new storylines–and a terrifying bonus power
  • Confront golems, fire-wielding mystics, and the armies of the dead
  • Receive a horoscope for your character, based on their virtues and humors

How the pre-order works

Today: Anyone can go to our Exile of the Gods page, play the first part of the game for free on our website, and purchase the game at a discounted price.

But the rest of the game is not available to play today, even if you pay now. Everyone who pre-orders the game will get to play it when it becomes available to the public on July 11th.

iOS/Android: On July 11th, we’ll make Exile of the Gods available in the Choice of Games Omnibus app on iOS, and as a free app on the Google Play and Amazon App stores. Anyone can play the first part of the game for free on iOS and Android (or on our website). Once you reach the end of the free trial, the app will ask you to either purchase the game or “restore” your purchase.

If you’ve pre-ordered the game on our website, you’ll be able to restore your purchase on iOS/Android at no additional charge, unlocking the rest of the game.

Windows/Mac/Linux: After purchasing the game, you can email support@choiceofgames.com and we’ll send you a Steam key that will unlock the game on July 11th.

Jun 20

2019

Asteroid Run: No Questions Asked — Deliver the cargo, get rich, or die trying!

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (0)

We’re proud to announce that Asteroid Run: No Questions Asked, the latest in our popular “Choice of Games” line of multiple-choice interactive-fiction games, is now available for Steam, Android, and on iOS in the Choice of Games Omnibus app. It’s 33% off until June 27th!

Captain! You have limited resources, a desperate crew, strange cargo and a company man is aboard to spy on you. Will you deliver your secret cargo to the Asteroid Belt on time? You and your crew will get rich or die trying!

Asteroid Run: No Questions Asked is a 325,000-word interactive science-fiction novel by Fay Ikin, where your choices control the story. It’s entirely text-based, without graphics or sound effects, and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

Cargo runs between Earth, Mars and the Asteroid Belt are commonplace, but deadly. You’re the captain of a merchant vessel, but this time, your contract has a twist: don’t open the cargo, don’t get in the way of its handler, and don’t ask questions. Deliver to Vesta Station.

What kind of captain will you be? Will you get your hands dirty in the engine, be an aspiring scientist, or a master negotiator? Will you focus on the health of your crew or the state of your ship? Will you put your crew in danger to protect the mysterious cargo, or will you join forces with vicious anarchists to fight against corporate wealth and corruption?

• Play as non-binary, female, or male, and find romance—asexual or otherwise—with people of all genders.
• Discover your crew’s secrets, or secure their well-being: their lives are in your hands.
• Abandon your position to join forces with the anarchists and their charismatic leader, and even turn double agent.
• Balance your ship’s resources, delivering the cargo on time, and your influence with groups in the solar system.
• Get rich being a bootlicker for the law-bringers or the megacorporations, or use their own corruption against them.

Whatever alliances you make, the Big Black is vast and unforgiving, and your corporate guest is watching for any mistakes. You’ve got six months to Vesta Station: make them count.

We hope you enjoy playing Asteroid Run: No Questions Asked. We encourage you to tell your friends about it, and recommend the game on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and other sites. Don’t forget: our initial download rate determines our ranking on the App Store. The more times you download in the first week, the better our games will rank.

Jun 17

2019

Author Interview: Fay Ikin, “Asteroid Run: No Questions Asked”

Posted by: Mary Duffy | Comments (0)

Captain! You have limited resources, a desperate crew, strange cargo and a company man is aboard to spy on you. Will you deliver your secret cargo to the Asteroid Belt on time? You and your crew will get rich or die trying! Cargo runs between Earth, Mars and the Asteroid Belt are commonplace, but deadly. You’re the captain of a merchant vessel, but this time, your contract has a twist: don’t open the cargo, don’t get in the way of its handler, and don’t ask questions. Deliver to Vesta Station. Asteroid Run: No Questions Asked is a 325,000-word interactive science-fiction novel by Fay Ikin. I sat down with Fay to talk about her first time writing IF, and the challenges thereof.

Asteroid Run is your first foray into interactive fiction, but you’re a fiction writer otherwise?

Despite being a scientist, I’ve always loved creative writing too. I’ve completed several novels–I’d love to get them out into the wider world one day–and I co-wrote mods for for the videogame Baldur’s Gate II with my now-wife (the author of Blood Money). When Hannah started writing her game, seeing behind the scenes of writing interactive fiction was just too tempting, so I had to join her!

What were some of the bigger challenges of writing the game?

From a personal perspective, it’s the challenge of balancing writing this huge, complex game with real life! We have a young child at home, and I also work full-time (as a teacher, and then in education management) so getting enough brainpower to be both creative enough to write, and alert enough to code properly, has sometimes been tough. I’ve also discovered I’m a little too ambitious for my own good: I’ve had to be ever-vigilant about branching too wide or too early, as when the game got too unwieldy it was tricky to pull things back together.

Have you read a fair amount of IF? What games did you enjoy or draw from in writing Asteroid Run?

The first IF I ever read was Choice of Romance back in 2013, and I’ve been a fan of CoG ever since. I actually find that if I’m in the middle of a project, reading fiction (interactive or otherwise) in similar genres gives me a little too much awe and interference, so there are a bunch of sci-fi CoG games that I am champing at the bit to play now Asteroid Run is finished: Rent-a-Vice, I, Cyborg and the Martian Job, here I come!

Outside of COG games, one of my biggest inspirations was actually Failbetter Games’ Sunless Sea. The intimidating emptiness around your ship, the feelings of isolation pushing you to keep your crew close: delicious! I asked myself, “This game, but in space? Let’s run with that.” And yes, I’ve greatly been enjoying Sunless Skies too!

Are you a fan of hard sci-fi? What other genres interest you?

I’ve been a sci-fi nut ever since I sat in front of the TV watching Star Trek: Voyager as a kid! Hard sci-fi has actually been one subgenre it’s taken me longer to get into: books devoted more to the ships than the people is less my thing. I prefer sci-fi that spends time with its characters and setting, and uses technology as the vehicle for plot and characterization, so for me: Star Trek, Farscape, Killjoys, Firefly. I’d be remiss not to mention Asteroid Run‘s biggest inspiration, The Expanse.

I love full-on space operas, and cyberpunk too. Outside of sci-fi, I do enjoy fantasy and urban fantasy, especially in tabletop and computer RPGs! Anyone else hyped for VtM: Bloodlines 2?

Do you have a favorite NPC that you liked writing best?

Ooh, I enjoy so many of them. I particularly liked writing characters where their drives and goals can clash with the MC’s: the sleazy suit, Victor Palladino, has to be one of my favorites. He’s just such a bad dude, but a bit of a silver fox too. I have to say, my favorite moments to write were scenes showcasing your crew’s interpersonal relationships: there’s an option for everyone to give each other holiday presents, and thinking about who would give each other what was such a blast. Found families are the best!

May 23

2019

Fool! — Jest your way from obscurity to royal acclaim!

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (1)

We’re proud to announce that Fool!, the latest in our popular “Choice of Games” line of multiple-choice interactive-fiction games, is now available for Steam, Android, and on iOS in the Choice of Games Omnibus app. It’s 30% off until May 30th!

Jest your way from obscurity to royal acclaim as the King’s pet, beloved by all! As a talented young court fool with dreams of fame, scrabble with other young jesters to secure prestigious positions in the courts of Brenton’s nobility. In a royal court humming with intrigue, keep them smiling as spies, assassins, blackmailers, ambitious nobles and a reluctant Heir wait in the wings.

Fool! is a 420,000-word interactive fantasy novel by Ben Rovik. It’s entirely text-based, without graphics or sound effects, and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

Dive-roll into the tightrope world of Brenton’s courtly entertainers, where your jests can see you seated at the right hand of power, or set down to the gallows.

What manner of fool are you: the shrewd knave ever ready with a venomous quip? The renowned artiste at pains to stay above the political fray? The bawdy buffoon known as much for off-stage antics as on-stage mirth? Or the clever counselor whose real audience is the noble ear they whisper into? Face unruly audiences onstage and skulduggerous schemers in the wings! Can you sling keen jests and still evade the whipping-post and assassin’s blade? The kingdom itself will be shaped by your choices!

• Play as male, female, non-binary; gay, straight, bi or ace.
• Evade tossed produce, whippings, assassins and the stocks with your wit and quick feet!
• Battle a lifelong rival for artistic glory within a secret society of writers and gadflys!
• Train your pet ape to master prodigious feats, or at least to stop biting you!
• Mediate between nobles to forge compromise; or stir them up to your own advantage!
• Partner with fellow thespians to win friends, or upstage them to win glory!
• Balance your passion for the limelight with your passion for …passion!

When the Master calls, you’d do well to come running—with bells on!

We hope you enjoy playing Fool!. We encourage you to tell your friends about it, and recommend the game on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and other sites. Don’t forget: our initial download rate determines our ranking on the App Store. The more times you download in the first week, the better our games will rank.

May 20

2019

Author Interview, Ben Rovik: “Fool!”

Posted by: Mary Duffy | Comments (1)

Jest your way from obscurity to royal acclaim as the King’s pet, beloved by all! As a talented young court fool with dreams of fame, scrabble with other young jesters to secure prestigious positions in the courts of Brenton’s nobility. In a royal court humming with intrigue, keep them smiling as spies, assassins, blackmailers, ambitious nobles and a reluctant Heir wait in the wings. Fool! is a 420,000-word interactive fantasy novel by Ben Rovik. I sat down with Ben to talk about his setting and why the jester is such an important figure. Fool! releases this Thursday, May 23rd. 

This is your first time writing interactive fiction, right? What drew you to this medium?
Yep, first time! As a kid of the 80’s I’ve always had a soft spot for choose-a-path stories, and had it in the back of my head that I’d do that kind of writing some day.  But I spent most of my time in and after college focused on playwriting, and had some early success getting ten-minute plays and comedies produced and published. That’s where I lived as a writer for many years.

Then my wife and I stumbled across Choice of Robots one day and found ourselves playing it again and again to see what we could discover. That was when I learned about CoG and ChoiceScript, and that amorphous “maybe someday” vision of writing interactive fiction suddenly looked feasible.

I’ve always loved pushing myself to try new forms. As a lifelong lover of fantasy with a fun side I created and self-published the Mechanized Wizardry series, getting a few novels and novellas under my belt; I’ve also written the libretto for two operas and music/lyrics for eight childrens’ musicals. Interactive fiction was the next big realm to venture into. The ten-minute play and the 400,000+ word interactive novel are about as far apart as written works get, like the teacup poodle and the bull mastiff side by side. It was definitely a shift! But I think having learned to imagine all the angles for how a scene can go will serve me well in everything I write going forward.

What is it about your quasi-Shakespearean setting that you enjoyed writing most?
So I’ve been in the tank for the Bard for ages, since I got painted green as Puck for the seventh-grade production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I was president of the Shakespeare Club in high school and did an apprenticeship at the Folger Shakespeare Library in DC that had a huge impact on me. I toured around as a professional actor for six years after college and Shakespeare was always part of the mix; I got to perform in huge roadhouses, little black boxes, school gyms and even prisons. It’s unbelievable how much of our modern vocabulary is just right out of Shakespeare’s brain; and while some of his plays are definitely clunkers (I was in All’s Well That Ends Well and it took the director a lot of cutting to make it fun) some of the others are so transcendently cool that I’m sure people will keep on with them for another 500 years.

There are some of Shakespeare’s settings where fools fit right in, like Verona and Athens. I wanted the Kingdom of Brenton in Fool! to feel more like the stuffy, serious, slightly on edge world of the Henry IV plays. Brenton’s a place where frowning and fretting come more easily than laughing, so the PC’s often got a big uphill battle in terms of winning over a room or a more intimate audience. In a down-to-earth fantasy like this, where you can have a big impact on the kingdom without ever touching a sword or shooting fire from your eyes, I thought that the most satisfying setting would be on the dour side; that way, if your choices start helping you win people over, you can see your corner of the kingdom start to transform into a more cheerful place.

I had a blast following Shakespearean conventions during this writing process, like having the nobles always speak in verse (except for Prinxe Hail, the heir to the Throne, who like Henry V switches freely between verse and prose). There’s also a lot of herbalism that shows up, which has been an interest of mine since my wife introduced me to the joys of picking wild blackberries and wineberries from the side of the road and I started seeing classifying the plants around me as more than just “weed,” “tree,” “bush,” etc. With the number of times I Googled things like “Toxic foliage Great Britain lethal dose” I’m sure I’m on a police watchlist somewhere. It was great fun to put it all together and hopefully put enough color on the different settings the PC moves between to make them pop in your mind while you read.

Why is the fool a compelling figure in literature?
The fool is the one who not only gets to tell the Emperor he has no clothes, but to point and laugh and mock his personal hygiene in the process. It’s always dramatically satisfying to see someone speak truth to power, and licensed fools play that role all over the place. The inversion of status makes it more exciting too; since fools are mostly commoners who are only allowed to be in court because luck or talent elevated them there, they take their entire careers, livelihoods, or lives in their hands when they dare to speak up to Kings and Queens, and they do it anyway. In stories with mostly noble or royal casts it can be hard for the audience to find someone to relate to on their level; having a fool in the mix makes sure there’s someone for the audience to latch on to.

Shakespeare really understood that moments of lightness and humor in otherwise dark pieces give the audience a little change of pace, and can help them get more enmeshed in the story to boot, since laughter is a social glue that binds groups together. Even the relentlessly dark Macbeth has the drunk porter who gives an extended riff on being Hell’s doorman.  These moments add color and shading to the whole experience, and when they’re written best they really deliver a big dramatic payoff.

I thought it’d be fun to explore life as a fool because of my own experiences as a performer, where as soon as you telegraph to an audience “I’m going to be funny for you now,” their deflector shields go up full power. There’s a sense of challenge between audience and performer that can be really intense. It’s easier IMHO to deliver funny lines as a character in a play, where the humor comes at the audience sideways through the story, than it is to go at them straight like stand-up comics do and just be up there saying funny stuff for a whole show’s duration. For a medieval-style fool, dressed in motley and capering around in the court while everyone’s chomping at their meat, I can hardly imagine the stress of having a target like that on your back. People are very good at choosing not to laugh if they’re not in the mood, so it seemed like there could be a lot of mileage in letting PCs be their own kind of fool and come at audiences with a lot of different tactics to win them over and lead the laughter, not become the butt of it.

What did you find most challenging about the writing process?
Stopping! In a play the dramatic throughlines and character arcs you’re trying to get across only happen one way, so even though it can take a lot of tweaking to get them right, once you’ve got them you can step back and watch.  For me in Fool!, trying to keep things balanced between different paths meant that every time I expanded this part, it made me want to tweak this other path, which had implications for that moment two chapters later, and on and on until I felt like things were out of balance again.

My plan is to detox after Fool! with much shorter formats again for a while. I got a lot of kind feedback about all the poetry that’s embedded in Fool! at various points, so I’ve been pushing ahead with that and writing sonnets about any and everything: blobfish, hold music, the interrobang, etc. I set up a Fiverr account at https://www.fiverr.com/users/benrovik/ to take mini-commissions for sonnets as a fun quick way to keep my hand in while I decompress from the big push to get Fool! ready.

Who’s your favorite NPC in Fool! ?
It was really fun to write the PC’s monkey-companion, who shows up in Act II. Trying to imagine how the little beast would react across a range of situations, helpfully and less so, was really enjoyable.

I think my favorite human NPC is the steward Malodoro, who’s as no-nonsense and imposing as they come (inspired by the similarly party-pooping Malvolio from Twelfth Night). I wrote this book over a span of years which included lots of huge personal transitions; consequently, in a number of cases when I went back to check something in an earlier chapter I’d come across a snatch of dialogue that I had absolutely no memory of writing. That happened several times with the Malodoro scenes, where a one-liner that had slipped my mind would catch me off guard in a good way. I can’t wait to see who readers connect with most!

May 17

2019

New Hosted Game! The Saga of Oedipus Rex by Jac Colvin

Posted by: Rachel E. Towers | Comments (0)

Hosted Games has a new game for you to play!

Your name is Oedipus, Prince of Corinth: And you’ve just discovered your future has been cursed by the gods themselves. Travel back to a time of magic and monsters in ancient Greece. Can you successfully fight to free yourself? Or will you succumb to the fate that was prophesied? It’s 25% off until May 24th!

The Saga of Oedipus Rex is an epic 100,000 word interactive fantasy novel by Jac Colvin, where your choices control the story. It’s entirely text-based—without graphics or sound effects—and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

• Play as Prince Oedipus, heir to the rulership of Corinth.
• Test your wits against the Sphinx.
• Immerse yourself in ancient Greek life.
• Remain in the country of your birth, or travel afar to Egypt.
• Will you appeal to the gods, challenge their decisions, or let fate run its course?
• With 8 distinct endings: Will you follow the future that has been prophesied or find your own way?

Jac Colvin developed this game using ChoiceScript, a simple programming language for writing multiple-choice interactive novels like these. Writing games with ChoiceScript is easy and fun, even for authors with no programming experience. Write your own game and Hosted Games will publish it for you, giving you a share of the revenue your game produces.

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